Ancestry of Ian & Cath Jeanneret

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1

Arthur Mainwaring MAXWELL
Regimental number59
ReligionChurch of England
OccupationStation manager
Marital statusSingle
Age at embarkation26
Next of kinFather, C J Maxwell, Commonwealth Bank, Hobart Tasmania
Enlistment date24 September 1914
Rank on enlistmentCorporal
Unit name6th Light Horse Regiment, A Squadron
AWM Embarkation Roll number10/11/1
Embarkation detailsUnit embarked from Sydney, New South Wales, on board Transport A29 Suevic on 21 December 1914
Rank from Nominal RollCaptain
Unit from Nominal Roll51st Battalion
Recommendations (Medals and Awards)
Mention in Despatches

Awarded, and promulgated: 'London Gazette', 28 December 1917 (second supplement); 'Commonwealth Gazette', 18 April 1918. Recommended for a second MID, 4 February 1919; awarded, and promulgated: 'London Gazette', 11 July 1919; 'Commonwealth Gazette', 30 October 1919.
Mention in Despatches

Awarded, and promulgated, 'London Gazette' No. 31448 (11 July 1919); 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 124 (30 October 1919).
Mention in Despatches

Awarded, and gazetted, 'London Gazette', second Supplement, No. 30448 (28 December 1917); 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 57 (18 April 1918).
FateReturned to Australia 16 June 1919
Medals
Distinguished Service Order

'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He made a valuable reconnaissance at a critical moment to restore touch between two brigades, taking great risks under heavy shell fire, and leading his men with great skill and courage. Throughout the whole engagement his actions were marked by sound judgment and promptitude, especially when the command of his battalion had devolved upon himself.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 219
Date: 20 December 1917
Military Cross

'For conspicuous gallantry in action. He carried out a valuable reconnaissance with great courage and determination. Later he personally directed relieving units to their positions under very heavy fire.'
Source: 'Commonwealth Gazette' No. 62
Date: 19 April 1917
Family/military connectionsBrother: 447 Capt Duncan Struan MAXWELL, 3rd Light Horse Regiment, C Squadron, returned to Australia 31 July 1918
Other detailsMedals: Military Cross, Distinguished Service Order, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal 
MAXWELL, Arthur Mainwaring (I4774)
 
2
Hull, Hugh Munro (1818–1882)
by R. L. Wettenhall
This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 4, (MUP), 1972

Hugh Munro Hull (1818-1882), civil servant, was born in London, the eldest son of George Hull and his wife Anna, daughter of Captain Hugh Munro of the Coldstream Guards. He sailed for Sydney with his parents and sister in the convict transport Tyne, and in September 1819 arrived at the Derwent where his father became assistant commissary general. The family home was soon established on a 2560-acre (1036 ha) land grant at Tolosa, Glenorchy; his father was transferred to Launceston in 1823 and after a few months Hugh became a boarder at Dr Thompson's Academy in Hobart. In 1829 he returned to Launceston to assist his father as a 'volunteer clerk'. On a visit to his office Lieutenant-Governor (Sir) George Arthur promised him a formal civil service appointment when he reached a suitable age. When his father retired in 1831 the family returned to Tolosa where Hugh joined them.

Hull was presented by his father at Government House in 1834 and became a clerk in the governor's office. Arthur took a personal interest in him, giving him books to read, and encouraging him to broaden his knowledge. He soon tired of the long daily rides between Tolosa and town, and after August 1835 lived in Hobart. He became senior clerk and keeper of the records in the colonial secretary's office in 1841 and in 1848 chief clerk in the governor's office. He got on very well with Lieutenant-Governor Sir William Denison, for whom he had great respect, and who when he left the colony glowingly acknowledged Hull's services and gave him a gold watch. Vigorous in community affairs Hull was also secretary of the new Tasmanian Public Library and of the committee for the review of convict expenditure, acted as unofficial government statist and as meteorologist at Government House and was a fellow of the local Royal Society.

The second phase of Hull's career began in June 1856 when he became police magistrate for the Bothwell, Hamilton and later, Green Ponds districts, living at Bothwell and also holding office as justice of the peace, coroner, chairman of Quarter Sessions, commissioner of the Court of Requests, returning officer for Cumberland electorate, chairman of Bothwell Road Trust and manager of Bothwell and Hamilton Savings Banks. Pluralities were then common and like many contemporaries he was pleased to recite his long list of offices. Nearly 40, he considered himself hale and hearty, weighed exactly nine stone (57 kg) and could ride fifty miles (80 km) without much fatigue, but the harsh inland climate and strenuous duties affected his health; in October 1857 his doctor advised him to give up riding and that meant the end of his country magistracy. Soon after responsible government was granted, he became assistant clerk-librarian of the House of Assembly, acting clerk in 1862 and clerk in 1864-82. He also served as secretary to royal commissions, organizer of Tasmania's exhibits at intercolonial and international exhibitions and secretary to the reception committee for Prince Alfred's visit in 1867 as well as putting his spare time to good use by developing his talents as scholar, lecturer and writer. He produced and published many statistical summaries, abstracts of legislation, newspaper articles, catalogues, calendars and guides to Tasmania. The government bought thousands of his Hints to Emigrants, and his Guide of 1858 and Royal Kalendar and Guide of 1859, published by Charles Walch, were forerunners of Walch's Tasmanian Almanac. Elected a member of the Royal Colonial Institute in 1873, he became a corresponding member of other intercolonial and overseas societies. He was elected manager of St John's Presbyterian Church of which he was a member, and other societies and associations availed themselves of his services as secretary. One of his greatest satisfactions was his organizing, at first through the Oddfellows' lodge, of a volunteer rifle company. In 1861 he was commissioned a captain and by persistent practice became a champion rifle shot.

Quiet, genial and obliging, Hull was a good family man. He took a close interest in his brothers and sisters, the twelfth of whom was born in 1841. On 31 October 1844 he married Antoinette Martha, daughter of James Aitkin, sheepfarmer and magistrate of Epping; they had two children before she died in July 1852. In raising his young family Hull was helped by his late wife's aunt, whose daughter, Margaret Basset Tremlett, he married on 3 January 1854. Hull died in Hobart from a heart attack on 3 April 1882, survived by his second wife and eleven of their twelve children. His second son, Hugh, had joined him on the parliamentary staff in 1868 and rose in the civil service to head the Stores Department.

Hull's obituarist in the Mercury declared that 'seldom in the longest lifetime has any man filled so many honorary positions'. Two of Hull's own writings furnish the main accounts of his career: The Experience of Forty Years in Tasmania (London, 1859); and a memoir written on extended leave in 1875.

——

1875
Hugo Munro Hull was only expressing the dominant view when he wrote: ‘We must come to the conclusion that
the beneficent Creator never intended Tasmania to be the permanent home of the savage; but to be filled with a free, and honest and a gentle people.’

https://www.anglicare-tas.org.au/sites/anglicare-tas.org.au/files/God's%20Own%20Country%20-%20reprint%202014.pdf 
HULL, Hugh Munro (I8377)
 
3
Malcolm William PARKER
Regimental number2441
ReligionCongregational
OccupationBoot manufacturer
AddressHawthorn, Victoria
Marital statusSingle
Age at embarkation21
Next of kinFather, William Salmon Parker, 2 Yarra Street, Hawthorn, Victoria
Previous military service64th Infantry
Enlistment date20 November 1917
Rank on enlistment2nd Air Mechanic
Unit nameOctober 1917 Reinforcements
AWM Embarkation Roll number8/15/2
Embarkation detailsUnit embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A38 Ulysses on 22 December 1917
Rank from Nominal RollPrivate
Unit from Nominal RollAustralian Flying Corps
FateDischarged 31 March 1919

https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=233626 
PARKER, Malcolm William (I11581)
 
4
SHOOBRIDGE, WILLIAM EBENEZER (1846-1940), politician, agriculturalist and industrial innovator, ROBERT WILKINS GIBLIN (1847-1936), agriculturalist and innovator, and LOUIS MANTON (1852-1939), agriculturalist, politician and Nature lover, were sons of Ebenezer Shoobridge (1820-1901), pioneer agriculturalist of Glenora and later member of the Tasmanian Legislative Council, and his wife Charlotte, née Giblin. Grandsons of William Shoobridge, all three mirrored the paternal pattern of agricultural innovation and participation in local and State government.
William was born on 7 January 1846 at his father's estate Glenayr, Richmond, Tasmania, and educated at Horton College, Ross. His study of hydrostatics and engineering led to extensive new irrigation techniques when, with his brother Robert, he took over the management of the family's Bushy Park estate. He developed an irrigation system for hops and apples which overcame the dryness of the deep porous soil and allowed extensive cultivation of such hop varieties as Early White Grape, Goldings, Green Grape and Red Golding. Over the period 1866-79 the acreage trebled and the crop increased sevenfold, becoming the basis of an important export industry. William further contributed to the hop industry with his visit to the Saaz drying kilns in Bohemia in 1905 and his subsequent construction of the first Saaz drying kiln in Tasmania.
Within the apple industry Shoobridge encouraged production of Sturmers, Pippins and Nonpareils for the London market, developing the 'cup' pattern technique of pruning the vigorous, irrigated crop; as chairman of the Derwent Valley Fruitgrowers' Association he oversaw the first significant export of 12,000 bushels in 1887. In 1892 he became the first president of the Tasmanian Agricultural Council.
Meanwhile his expertise as an irrigation engineer had earned him a wide reputation; he was asked to plan waterworks on the Derwent and tributaries, and to design twenty other irrigation ventures including the 8000-acre (3238 ha) scheme at the Brock brothers' Lawrenny estate. His advice was formally sought by the Tasmanian and Victorian governments, although some of his more prophetic schemes for combining hydro-electric development with irrigation were disregarded. He was notable too as an early recorder of weather data in Tasmania.
A justice of the peace from 1878 and chairman of the Derwent Road Trust, William was a lay reader in the Wesleyan Methodist Church and for thirty-eight years a Sunday school superintendent. A member of the Workers' Political League and the Australian Labor Party, he was Labor member for Franklin in the House of Assembly in 1916-19 and 1922-25 and for Wilmot in 1925-28 and 1929-31. His experience as a paternal employer in intensive smallholding production, mixed with a sincere religiosity, produced a Utopian socialism: a vision of a self-supporting, industrialized 'Big Tasmania' benefiting all who in 'any way by the exercise of their personal powers and faculties took some active part in the many processes of production'. His social productivism distanced him from the essentially conservative Tasmanian Labor Party, from which he resigned in 1932, but his technical expertise was recognised by the Earle government which commissioned him in 1914 to inquire into power and irrigation in Canada and the United States of America. This mission led to encouragement for the Australian Wood Pulp & Paper Co. to establish an industry in Tasmania.
On 8 December 1869 in Hobart Town with Wesleyan forms William had married Ann Benson Mather, granddaughter of Robert Mather. On his death in Hobart on 17 May 1940 he was survived by their three daughters and three sons.
Robert Shoobridge was born at Glenayr on 11 June 1847. Moving from Bushy Park, he took over Valleyfield estate near New Norfolk, producing an annual apple crop of 40,000 bushels. He had a particular interest in cool storage: as president of the Fruitgrowers' Association he travelled to London with a cargo of apples, advising on storage and critical temperatures, to establish standard shipboard conditions.
Locally a road trustee and municipal councillor, Robert was responsible for modernization of the New Norfolk water-supply system. He built the New Norfolk Cottage Hospital and promoted church construction at Glenfern, Molesworth, Moonah and New Norfolk. He was government visitor to the New Norfolk Mental Asylum. Robert died in Hobart on 13 May 1936, predeceased by his wife Annie Rebecca, née Crouch, whom he had married in Hobart Town with Wesleyan forms on 7 December 1871, and by five of their children. Five daughters survived him.
Louis Shoobridge was born at New Norfolk on 25 October 1851 and educated at Somerset House School, Hobart Town. He too joined the family fruit-growing enterprise, eventually developing the Fenton Forest estate which expanded into the extensive Glenora estate on the Styx and Russell Falls rivers. Credited with experimenting on over five hundred apple varieties, he attained export levels of 16,000 bushels a year and like his brothers travelled to London to further the export trade. He was president of the Agricultural Council, Royal Agricultural Society, Tasmanian Farmers' and Stock Owners' Association and the Australian Pomological Committee, as well as chairman of the National Park Board and member of many other societies. He was president of the Melville Street Methodist Church and vice-president of the Protestant Alliance of Friendly Societies. As member for Derwent in the Legislative Council in 1921-37 Shoobridge promoted agricultural and regional interests.
Perhaps, however, his most enduring achievement stemmed from his selection and preservation of fifty acres (20 ha) near the beautiful Russell Falls. The site was proclaimed part of an enlarged 300-acre (121 ha) reserve in 1885 and in 1917 was incorporated into the 27,000 acre (10,927 ha) Mt Field National Park. With Alan Wardlaw Louis also planted the Pioneer Avenue of trees between Hobart and Oatlands.
Louis married first, on 27 September 1876 with Wesleyan forms at New Town, Amy (d.1878), daughter of Colonel Thomas Lidbetter of Bombay; second on 19 April 1882 at Hobart with Congregationalist forms, Esther Kentish Charlotte, daughter of (Sir) Philip Fysh. Louis died in Hobart on 12 March 1939, remembered as a 'vital contributer to the life of the community' and 'a great lover of nature' who had no greater satisfaction than 'the planting of trees and the establishment of gardens'. He was survived by his wife and their four sons including (Sir) Rupert (1883-1962), later president of the Tasmanian Legislative Council.
Some flavour of the Shoobridge milieu is conveyed by the annual strawberry feast the Shoobridges held for their workers at the famous Bushy Park hop-barn which 'had Biblical texts on its outer walls and was frequently used as a church on Sundays. The hop-picking was always closed with a festival in true Kentish style. Poles garlanded with hops and bedecked with coloured ribbons, were carried around in procession amid wild cheering. A dinner, with music and song brought the day to its close'. The strength of the family tradition is also preserved in the inscription of the original hop kiln built by Ebenezer Shoobridge and known as the 'Text Kiln' from the Biblical texts also engraved on it, which reads 'Erected by Ebenezer Shoobridge, 1867, assisted by his wife and three sons and five daughters. Union is Strength'.
Select Bibliography
L. S. Bethell, The Valley of the Derwent (Hob, no date); Cyclopedia of Tasmania, vol 1 (Hob, 1900); K. R. von Stieglitz, A History of New Norfolk and the Derwent Valley (Launc, 1962); Hobart Town Gazette, 5 Mar 1885; Tasmanian Mail, 6 Apr 1878, 1 Sept 1888, 8 June 1922; Mercury (Hobart), 6 Apr 1903, 30 May 1922, 1 Nov 1924, 14 May 1936, 13, 15 Mar 1939, 18 May 1940; Weekly Courier (Launceston), 16, 23, 30 Dec 1931; P. Shackel, Conservation: A Study in the Growth of Public Interest (B.A. Hons thesis, University of Tasmania, 1968); H. A. Broinowski, W. E. Shoobridge: A Tasmanian Visionary (B.A. Hons thesis, University of Tasmania, 1970). More on the resources
Author: Peter Chapman
Print Publication Details: Peter Chapman, 'Shoobridge, William Ebenezer (1846 - 1940)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 11, Melbourne University Press, 1988, pp 601-603.
http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A110616b.htm

Mr. W. E. Shoobridge In Excellent Health
Mr. W.E. Shoobridge, of Hobart, will celebrate his 94th birthday anniversary tomorrow. Mr. Shoobridge is in excellent health and retains full possession of the faculties, which, during his long public career, have stamped bim as an outstandlng Tasmanian.
Mr. Shoobridge has had a long association with the development of the State. To him goes the credit for the foundation of the apple export industry, he was responsible for the commencement of the tobacco industry in Tasmania, and his Irrigation scheme brought a high degree of fertility to Bushy Park.
He is a son of the late Ebenezer Shoobridge, and a grandson of the late William Shoobridge, who came to Tasmania in 1822 and brought the first hop plants to the State.
Mr. Shoobridge was elected a member of the House of Assembly in 1916 and again in 1922, when he held his seat until 1928. 
SHOOBRIDGE, William Ebenezer (I9200)
 
5
The AIF Project
Regimental number66479
ReligionChurch of England
OccupationFarmer
AddressSydney, New South Wales
Marital statusSingle
Age at embarkation18
Next of kinFather, F E Jeanneret, 'Herne', Futuna Street, Hunters Hill, Sydney, New South Wales
Enlistment date29 July 1918
Rank on enlistmentPrivate
Unit nameNew South Wales Reinforcement 21
AWM Embarkation Roll number23/111/6
Embarkation detailsUnit embarked from Adelaide, South Australia, on board HMAT A36 Boonah on 22 October 1918
Miscellaneous details (Nominal Roll)Name does not appear on Nominal Roll

THE METEORITE.
DESCRIPTION BY EYEWITNESSES.
Mr. A. F. Jeanneret, of ' "Marengo,"
Richmond, writes:-Re the reported
falling of a meteor at about 12.30 a.m.
on Friday, while returning from Hobart
on Thursday night I observed the
meteor and it was a wonderful sight.
It started from about half-way up the
arc of the sky towards the south, and
travelled right across the heavens to
about the same position in the east
before going out. My attention was
first attracted by the brilliant flare and
then by a hissing sound. The meteor
seemed shaped like a club, with a bluish
light flaring from it, sometimes chang-
ing to orange and forming a huge ball
with a long tail. It lit up the whole
surroundings and temporarily extin-
guished the moonlight. When it reached
about half-way down the arc east, it
went out and could then be seen to be
followed by a small red ball with sparks
flying from it till it disappeared behind
the hills. A few minutes later a low
rumbling was heard. Viewed from Ris-
don-road, about a mile out of Richmond,
it seemed to fall near Sorell or the
causeway. Re the suggestion that it
may have been a flare from the fleet,
it seemed too big and bright for that.
Star shells were seen earlier in the
evening, and the rumbling of guns was
heard about 1 a.m.

The Mercury Wednesday 14 February 1923 
JEANNERET, Alan Francis (I3517)
 
6
The earliest Vokes to be found in Limerick’s records is an Edward Vokes, Clothier, who was first mentioned in 1703 as residing in Thomondgate on the west bank of the Shannon very close to Thomond bridge. He was elected Sheriff of the City in June 1714 to serve from October 1714 to October 1715. As Sheriff1 he co-signed a petition to England which was also co-signed by a Joseph Vokes who must have been an adult contemporary, perhaps even a brother. Sheriff Edward Vokes is mentioned in a Ballad called “The Battle of the Mayor’s Stone” commemorating a clash between the Guild of Clothiers and other Guilds in 1714/5.2 After serving as Sheriff, Edward was appointed to the Common Council and would have been known as Edward Vokes, Burgess, thereafter. One would expect to see Edward elected Mayor of Limerick some 10 years later but for some unknown reason he was never chosen for the Office even though he didn’t die until 1749. His son William was Sheriff in 1741 so we know that the family remained involved in the City’s political life. William unfortunately died in 1750 so we will never know if he could have become Mayor of Limerick. An abstract from a will, written in 1738, by his brother-in-law, the Rev. William Campbell, supplies us with the names of some of Edward’s children and other family connections. Campbell’s will abstract lists his nieces and nephews in the following order: -
• Niece, Elizabeth Vokes now Dixon, wife of Basset Dixon. (Also spelt Dickson)
• Mary Vokes, now wife of Henry Long.
• Nephew Thomas Vokes, Counsellor, now in London. (Son of William and Martha of London.)
• Niece Angel Vokes.
• The children of Edward Vokes of the City of Limerick, Burgess, by my sister Catherine, deceased.
• Nephews William and Thomas Vokes,
• Nieces Martha Wrightson, widow and Angel Vokes. (A Martha Wrightson married a John FitzGerald on the 17th of Sept. 1739, in St. Munchin’s church in Limerick).

In 1709 Edward Vokes, Clothier, was granted a plot of ground for 51 years at a rent of £2-10-0. The grant was until 1760. In 1769 this same plot was granted to Francis Sargent who had married a Miss Ellinor Vokes in May 1761. (Betham’s Will Abstracts names her as Ellinor.) 
VOKES, Edward (I19398)
 
7
We now know that Thomas Vokes and his wife Elizabeth Barker were the parents of Thomas Vokes “the younger” who married Susanna Phillips in January 1767. Because of the Barker connection they are the most likely couple to have settled at Cragbeg, which had an imposing four storied mansion built on the land there. (See Taylor and Skinners 1777 Map). Cragbeg was the address of a George Vokes when he died in 1771, he was succeeded by a Thomas Vokes, who died in 1800. The Christian name of the heir is a strong hint that George’s father’s name was also Thomas. Thomas, who died in 1800 was succeeded by his son George. This George lost Cragbeg in the Court of Chancery in 1816. The Estate was encumbered with unpayable debts which could only be paid off by selling the lands or the lease on the lands. 
VOKES, Thomas (I20512)
 
8
NAPIER JAIL HISTORY
About 125 years ago a young man was sent to Napier's jail for a month for theft.
The year was 1887, and Alick Evan McGregor, born in India in 1869, was described on his police record as a "notorious young thief with a freckled face".
The 18-year-old is one of 165 criminals - petty thieves and public swearers to horse stealers and murderers - profiled in the New Zealand Police Museum on-line exhibition Suspicious Looking.
McGregor was one of about a dozen of them jailed in Napier.
His police sheet showed he arrived in New Zealand aged 10, had blue eyes, light eyebrows, at five feet eight inches weighed 10 stone, and had "medium" nose, mouth and chin.
A surveyor before his sentencing, he spent his month in jail working as a labourer. His friends lived in Hastings.

LARCENY AS A BAILEE.
Evan Murray Macgregor, a young man, was charged with the larceny as a bailee, on the 28th of December last, of a gelding, the property of Thomas Hewetson. Prisoner, who was defended by Sir William Wasteneys, pleaded not guilty. Thomas Hewetson, examined by Mr Cotterill, deposed that he left the horse in question in the keeping of a man named Brady. Witness had some talk with a boy named McDonald about selling the horse to a third party for £4, but as that party would only give £3 the negotiations fell through, and witness said he would keep the horse. Neither prisoner nor anybody else was subsequently authorised to deal with the horse, Andrew Brady, a laborer residing at Clive, remembered the previous witness - leaving a cream-colored gelding in witness's charge. A boy named McDonald took the horse away in October to ride it to prosecutor's, and brought the horse back again and re delivered it to witness. Subsequently prisoner came to see witness, to ask him if he thought the pony was worth £4. Witness replied that it was, and prisoner said that he would buy the animal from McDonald. He went away, and on the following morning he came back and said he had seen McDonald, and had arranged to take the horse, "Witness accordingly let the pony go. Soon after that McDonald came to the place, and as a result of a conversation went after prisoner and brought him back with the horse. Prisoner asked witness what all the trouble was about, saying that McDonaid would not let him have the pony. Witness said that altered the case. Prisoner then said he wished to go to Mr Chamber's place, and witness, after telling prisoner that the horse was no longer for sale, lent the animal to him to ride to Mr Chamber's on the expressed understanding that he was responsible for its return. In December witness went to where prisoner stayed at Clive and asked where the horse was, and he replied that he sold it to a Mr Hipe. At witnesses request prisoner went with him to Hipe, to ask for the pony, And Hipe offered to sell it back for £5. Witness told Hipe that the pony had only been lent to prisoner to ride to Mr Chambers's place. Hlpe said, that prisoner when be sold the pony represented it as his own. The witness was cross-examined at considerable length by counsel for prisoner, but did not vary his statements. Archibald McDonald gave corroborative evidence. He saw prisoner at Clive on the 23rd of November with the horse, and asked him how he got it, He said that Brady had given it to him. Witness went to Brady, who stated how the prisoner had got the horse, and then subsequently compelled prisoner to take the pony back to Brady, under threat of trouble if he did not do so. Subsequently prisoner borrowed the horse to ride to Mr Chambers's place. The cross - examination elicited no further facts bearing on the case. A Henry Hipe, living at Whakatu, deposed to meeting prisoner at Clive at the end of December last, having in his possession the pony referred to. He asked witness to buy the pony for £3. Witness offered £2, which was accepted. A receipt for £3 was given to witness by prisoner. Witness did not notice the receipt till his attention was drawn to it by a third party who said that the receipt was no - good " because it had no brand on it." Later prisoner came to witness's house and asked for the pony back, saying that there was something wrong." Witness thought prisoner only wanted to get the pony because he had found a purchaser at a higher price. Next day the pony was given to the police. John Pearce Smiths-licensee of the Farndoh Hotel, gave evidence as to the Bale by prisoner to Hipe. Constable Kennedy deposed to the arrest of prisoner, who admitted that he had sold the horse, and asked for time to be allowed to settle the matter.
The prisoner, sworn, deposed that his name was Alick Evan Caithness Murray Macgregor, and that he had no settled occupation. He received remittances from England. He had a conversation with the witness McDonald about the purchase of a pony which he said he had authority to sell. He asked £4 for it McDonald also in witness's presence offered the horse to another man for £4, but he would only give £3. Subsequently witness asked McDonald to sell the pony, and he told witness that he could get it at Brady's place. After witness got the horse McDonald objected to him having to, and he took it back to Brady, who asked witness if he would take the whole responsibility of the pony. Witness said he would, and there was an understanding that he could take the pony, and if he did not return it after the shearing he was to pay £4. The reason he sold the pony afterwards was because he had no use for it. He was entitled to the reversion of an estate in Cheshire, in the Earldom of Caithness, and had received remittances on account of it. Counsel for prisoner having addressed the jury, his Honour rammed up the evidence, and' the jury after an absence of an hour and a half returned with a verdict of guilty. They recommended him to mercy on account of his youth. Two previous convictions, both for larceny, were put in against prisoner. One took place in 1885 and the other in 1887.
Counsel for prisoner urged that both his previous convictions were for paltry offences, and he had been two months in prison since his arrest on the present charge. His Honour said that the convictions were for trifling offences. In 1885 he stole eighteen-pence, and in 1880, being then 17 years of age, he was sentenced to a month's imprisonment for stealing a meerschaum pipe. His Honour questioned Constable Kennedy as to prisoner's character in Cllve, and the constable stated that prisoner bore the reputation of not being able to keep his hands off the property of others. Quite recently his mother had to make good the value of a horse which prisoner borrowed and took to Napier and sold. Prisoner was for a few months in the New Zealand Permanent Force. In response to the usual question, prisoner thanked his Honour and the jury for the trouble they had taken with his case. The verdict was against him, but he supposed he must knuckle down to it. His Honour sentenced prisoner to four months' hard labor. The court then rose till 10 o'clock this (Friday) morning).

THE CAITHNESS ESTATES.
A NEW ZEALANDER IN LUCK,
In reference to the cablegram published yesterday stating that litigation in connection with the ownership of the English estates of the 12th Earl of Caithness, has resulted in half being allotted to Mr Murray McGregor, a resident in Clive (Hawke's Bay), New Zealand, we clip the following from the "John o' Groat's Journal of March 7th :—"ln the High Court of Justice, Chancery Division, before Mr Justice Wright, on Wednesday, an action, instituted by Captain H. W. Bairnsfather of Beechwood, and Mr Finlay of Auld, S.S.C., Edinburgh, on behalf of Mr Alexander Evan Caithness Murray Macgregor, of Clive, Australia, against the trustees of the late Sir George Philip Alexander Sinclair, fifteenth Earl of Caithness, came up for decision. The late Earl of Caithness died possessed of the Stagenhoe Park estates, Hertfordshire, and the gift of these in his trust disposition being invalided by the English Mortmain Act of 1888, the eamo fell to his next-of-kin. One half of the estates were successfully claimed by Mr James Buchanan, of Craigend, a male descendent of Janet, Lady Buchanan, a daughter of James, twelfth Earl of Caithness. After three years of researching, the other "claimed for Mr Murray Macgregor, a great-grandson of the other daughter of the twelfth Earl, Lady Charlotte, who married General Murray Macgregor in 1810. After consideration of the evidence and certificates adduced, Mr Justice Wright granted decree in favour of the claimants, the case being transferred to Mr Justice Chitly to be conjoined with that of Sir James Buchanan in an action of accounting against Lord Caithness trustees. This decision confirms Mr Murray Macgregor as heir-at-law of General Murray Macgregor, in virtue of which along with Sir Malcolm Macgregor of Macgregor, he holds the joint nomination of parties to receive the benefits of Sir John Macgregor's bequeath.”

From Ancestry records of David M Fox:

Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor and Letitia Pongo

- David Fox 2017 with research by Michelle Karauria 2013

Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor was born in 1869 in West Bengal India, the son of Alexander Caithness Ronald Munro Murray MacGregor of the Bengal Uncovenanted Civil Service (1838–1873) and Jessie Miller Bairnsfather (1847–1905)
Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor had arrived in New Zealand in 1879, aged 10, with his parents. He was entitled to the reversion of an estate in Cheshire, in the Earldom of Caithness, and had received the remittances from England on account of it. As a result he admitted he had no settled occupation, but had, at one point, been a surveyor and was for a few months in the New Zealand Permanent Force. By 1887 his father had died but his mother was living in Clive.
He was described as having blue eyes, light eyebrows, at five feet eight inches weighed 10 stone, and had "medium" nose, mouth and chin and with a freckled face.
According to a police report. he developed a reputation of not being able to keep his hands off the property of others. His mother had to make good the value of a horse which prisoner borrowed, took to Napier and sold.

However, after serving time for the theft of the horse, in 1893 he eventually came into posession of half the estates stemming from the 12th Earl of Caithness.

Background

The following research is by Michelle Karauria who originally shared this in 2013
In 1887 Alick Evan McGregor was described on his police record as a "notorious young thief with a freckled face". The 18-year-old was one of 165 criminals - petty thieves and public swearers to horse stealers and murderers - profiled in the New Zealand Police Museum on-line exhibition. McGregor was one of about a dozen of them jailed in Napier.
His police sheet showed he arrived in New Zealand aged 10, had blue eyes, light eyebrows, at five feet eight inches weighed 10 stone, and had "medium" nose, mouth and chin.
A surveyor before his sentencing, he spent his month in jail working as a labourer. His friends lived in Hastings.
Larceny as a Bailee
[Alick] Evan Murray Macgregor, a young man, was charged with the larceny as a bailee, on the 28th of December last, of a gelding, the property of Thomas Hewetson.
Prisoner, who was defended by Sir William Wasteneys, pleaded not guilty.
Thomas Hewetson, examined by Mr Cotterill, deposed that he left the horse in question in the keeping of a man named Brady. Witness had some talk with a boy named McDonald about selling the horse to a third party for £4, but as that party would only give £3 the negotiations fell through, and witness said he would keep the horse.
Neither prisoner nor anybody else was subsequently authorised to deal with the horse, Andrew Brady, a laborer residing at Clive, remembered the previous witness leaving a cream-colored gelding in witness's charge.
A boy named McDonald took the horse away in October to ride it to prosecutor's, and brought the horse back again and he delivered it to witness. Subsequently prisoner came to see witness, to ask him if he thought the pony was worth £4. Witness replied that it was, and prisoner said that he would buy the animal from McDonald. He went away, and on the following morning he came back and said he had seen McDonald, and had arranged to take the horse. Witness accordingly let the pony go.
Soon after that McDonald came to the place, and as a result of a conversation went after prisoner [Alick] and brought him back with the horse. Prisoner asked witness what all the trouble was about, saying that McDonald would not let him have the pony. Witness said that altered the case.
Loan of Horse
Prisoner then said he wished to go to Mr Chamber's place, and witness, after telling prisoner that the horse was no longer for sale, lent the animal to him to ride to Mr Chamber's on the expressed understanding that he was responsible for its return.
Sale of Horse
In December witness went to where prisoner stayed at Clive and asked where the horse was, and he replied that he sold it to a Mr Hipe. At witnesses request prisoner went with him to Hipe, to ask for tbe pony, and Hipe offered to sell it back for £5. Witness told Hipe that the pony had only been lent to prisoner to ride to Mr Chambers's place. Hipe said, that prisoner, when be sold the pony, represented it as his own.
The witness was cross-examined at considerable length by counsel for prisoner, but did not vary his statements. Archibald McDonald gave corroborative evidence. He saw prisoner at Clive on the 23rd of November with the horse, and asked him how he got it. He said that Brady had given it to him. Witness went to Brady, who stated how the prisoner had got the horse, and then subsequently compelled prisoner to take the pony back to Brady, under threat of trouble if he did not do so. Subsequently prisoner borrowed the horse to ride to Mr Chambers's place. The cross-examination elicited no further facts bearing on the case. ?
Henry Hipe, living at Whakatu, deposed to meeting prisoner at Clive at the end of December last, having in his possession the pony referred to. He asked witness to buy the pony for £3. Witness offered £2, which was accepted. A receipt for £3 was given to witness by prisoner. Witness did not notice the receipt till his attention was drawn to it by a third party who said that the receipt was no - good "because it bad no brand on it." Later prisoner came to witness's house and asked for the pony back, saying that there was something wrong. Witness thought prisoner only wanted to get the pony because he had found a purchaser at a higher price. Next day tbe pony was given to the police.
John Pearce Smiths, licensee of the Farndoh Hotel, gave evidence as to the sale by prisoner to Hipe. Constable Kennedy deposed to the arrest of prisoner, who admitted that he had sold the horse, and asked for time to be allowed to settle the matter.
Alick's Evidence
The prisoner, sworn, deposed that his name was Alick Evan Caithness Murray Macgregor, and that he had no settled occupation. He received remittances from England. He had a conversation with the witness [Archibald] McDonald about the purchase of a pony which he said he had authority to sell. He asked £4 for it McDonald also, in witness's presence offered the horse to another man for £4, but he would only give £3. Subsequently witness asked McDonald to sell the pony, and he told witness that he could get it at Brady's place. After witness got the horse McDonald objected to him having to, and he took it back to Brady, who asked witness if he would take the whole responsibility of the pony. Witness said he would, and there was an understanding that he could take the pony, and, if he did not return it after the shearing, he was to pay £4. The reason he sold the pony afterwards was because he had no use for it.
He was entitled to the reversion of an estate in Cheshire, in the Earldom of Caithness, and had received remittances on account of it.
Guilty
Counsel for prisoner having addressed the jury, his Honor summed up the evidence, and the jury, after an absence of an hour and a half, returned with a verdict of guilty. They recommended him to mercy on account of his youth.
Recommended to Mercy

Two previous convictions, both for larceny, were put in against prisoner. One took place in 1885 and the other in 1887.

Counsel for prisoner urged that both his previous convictions were for paltry offences, and he had been two months in prison since his arrest on the present charge. His Honor said that the convictions were for trifling offences. In 1885 he stole eighteenpence, and in 1880, being then 17 years of age, he was sentenced to a month's imprisonment for stealing a meerschaum pipe.
Character
His Honor questioned Constable Kennedy as to prisoner's character in Cllve, and the constable stated that prisoner bore the reputation of not being able to keep his hands off the property of others. Quite recently his mother had to make good the value of a horse which prisoner borrowed and took to Napier and sold. Prisoner was for a few months in the New Zealand Permanent Force.
Sentence
In response to the usual question, prisoner thanked his Honor and the jury for the trouble they had taken with his case. The verdict was against him, but he supposed he must knuckle down to it. His Honor sentenced prisoner to four months' hard labor. The court then rose till 10 o'clock this (Friday) morning).
The Earl of Caithness Estates
Evening Post 20 Apr 1893:
"The World asserts that the litigation in connection with the ownership of the English estates of the Twelfth Earl of Caithness has resulted in half being allotted to Mr Murray McGregor, a resident in Clive, New Zealand.
"Murray McGregor, referred to in the cable message, was educated at the Napier High School, and early developed tendencies to Kleptomania. He has been twice convicted of larceny, and a the February sittings of the Supreme Court was sentenced to four months imprisonment for the larceny as bailee of a horse."
Press, 21 Apr 1893:
"Evan Murray Wilfred MacGergor, who is referred to in the London cable message today is well-known here. His father is dead, but his mother, who re-married, is living in Clive. He was educated partly at the Napier Boys High School and early developed kleptomaniac tendencies which, at an early age, landed him in trouble. He was tried here on the last sitting of the Supreme Court for larceny as a bailee of a horse, and is now serving a sentence of four months' imprisonment with hard labour. At his trial two previous convictions for larceny were put in."

North Otago Times 27 April 1893:
"The World speaks of the twelfth earl, but the present holder of the title, according to Hazell, is the seventeenth. He succeeded to the title in 1891 and lives on a farm in Dakota, USA.
"There would seem to be a strain of eccentricity in the Sinclair family. The earl of thirty five years ago was a curious fellow. He fancied himself as an amateur mechanic and had a steamer built and named after himself, to trade between Edinburgh and Wick.
"The trade did not pay and matters were not mended by his habit of almost constantly travelling by the steamer and bossing the crew, besides letting passengers know that he was owner in an offensive way.
"At length one dirty day the vessel arrived off Aberdeen bar at low water. Captain Hodge knew he must wait but the earl-owner was contemptuous of time and tide, deposed the skipper, ordered "full speed ahead" and soon found himself on the bar with the bottom out of his ship. The crew were taken off but the earl refused to budge. As the tide rose and great rollers began to sweep over the wreck, the harbourmaster went off in a boat to bring the semi-lunatic ashore by force. He was found in the engine room up to his waist in water tugging at the starting levers although the fires had been out for hours !
"The ship was not insured, and the earldom was a poor one, so it is likely that the estates have been since encumbered. The title is a very old one, dating from 1455."
Earls of Caithness
Thank you Michelle for the great research to here. However I was left a little confused as to why Alick had received half the estate, so I did some further research.
Wikipedia gives a listing of the Earls of Caithness:

James Sinclair, the 12th Earl of Caithness, died in 1823, leaving the title to his son
. Alexander Sinclair, the 13th Earl of Caithness, who died in 1855 passed the title to his son
.. James Sinclair, 14th Earl of Caithness, who died 28 Mar 1881 passed the title to his son
... George Sinclair the 15th Earl of Caithness, who died 28 May 1889 unmarried and without issue

Debretts says:

"The Earldom of Caithness, ... became dormant in 1889 on the death of the fifteenth earl without issue. Mr. J. A. Sinclair, son of the late Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. Sinclair, B.A., and a J.P. for Aberdeenshire, then claimed the earldom and a baronetcy as heir-male."
Advertiser 22 Jan 1891:

"Mr. Jas. A. Sinclair ... presented a petition to the Court of Session to establish his claim to the title, which was adjudged to him by the Sheriff of the Chancery of Scotland in January, 1890. His heir is his son John Sutherland Sinclair, Lord Berriedale, who is a large ranch-owner in the United States."
Evening Journal 20 Jan 1891:
When "The fifteenth Earl died on May 27, 1889, unmarried ... it was supposed that the title would pass to George, senior representative of the second son of Robert younger brother of the 12th Earl. In January, 1890, however, the Sheriff of the Chancery of Scotland adjudged James A Sinclair, the deceased, to be heir to the Earldom."
The Argus 20 Apr 1893:
Re The Caithness Estates London, April 19.
"The society journal, the World, states that the litigation with regard to the ownership of the estates of the 12th Earl of Caithness, who died in 1823, has resulted in half the estates being adjudged to Mr. William Murray Macgregor, a resident of Clive, in New Zealand."
This record goes on to show the link to the McGregor family:

"Charlotte Ann, youngest daughter of the 12th Earl of Caithness, married in 1810 Major-General Alexander Murray Macgregor, who died in 1823. She died in 1854."

The other recipient was the Earl of Murray as noted in the Queensland Times 20 Apr 1893
"The World states that the litigation in connection with the ownership of the English estates of the 12th Earl of Caithness have resulted in half of the estates being allotted to the Earl of Murray and half to Mr. Macgregor, a resident of Clive, New Zealand."
The Peerage then indicates:
Lt.-Col. John Sutherland Sinclair had a son who inherited the title Earl of Caithness, he was
. James Augustus Sinclair, 16th Earl of Caithness, died on 20 Jan 1891 and passed the title to his son
.. John Sutherland Sinclair, 17th Earl of Caithness, who succeded to the title in 1891 and died unmarried on 30 May 1914.
So it is correct that a settlement of half the estate on Alick Murray-Macgregor in 1893 was from the estate of the 16th Earl of Caithness who died 1891, and we now know how Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor came to inherit half the Sinclair estate even though John Sutherland Sinclair, a direct male descendant, was still living.

Alick had a valid claim to the estates of Caithness from Charlotte Anna Sinclair, the daughter of the 12th Earl of Caithness, as follows:

Sir James Sinclair, 12th Earl of Caithness (1766–1823) m. Jean Jane Campbell (1769–1853)
. Charlotte Anna Sinclair (1792–1854) m.1810 Alexander Murray MacGregor (1778–1823)
.. Alexander Nugent Murray MacGregor (1811–1845) m. Eleanor Elenor Ellinor Hopper (1817–)
... Alexander Caithness Ronald Munro Murray MacGregor (1838–1873) m. Jessie Miller Bairnsfather (1847–1905)
.... Alexander Evan Caithness Murray MacGregor (Alick) (1869–1899) m.1896 Letitia Pongo

However he did not inherit the title of 17th Earl of Caithness, which went to John Sutherland Sinclair, who in 1905, sold his holdings in North Dakota and returned to Scotland to take control of his hereditary estate, later returning to the USA.
Marriage
Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor was married on 8 Apr 1896 at Wellington to Letitia Pongo of Wairoa
Hawkes Bay Herald 8 Apr 1896:
Murray-Macgregor - Pongo. At Wellington on 8th inst. by Rev Father Devoy, Catholic Church, A E Caithness Murray-Macgregor, eldest son of the late Alexander Caithness Murray-Macgregor of the Bengal Uncovenanted Civil Service, to Letitia Pongo of Wairoa, Hawkes Bay.
Letitia was also known as Rithia or Titiha Pongo or Paora

Children

Aleck Evan Murray-Macgregor and Letitia Pongo had the following children:

. John Caithness Murray-Macgregor (1897–1966)
. Hugh Evan Murray-Macgregor (1899–1968)
. Walter Robert Peter Murray Macgregor (1900–1974)
Death
Alick Evan Murray-Macgregor died on 2 Nov 1899 at Wairoa, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand aged 30.

The Star Wairoa Hawkes Bay 7 Nov 1899:
"Mr Murray McGregor formerly of Clive, who succeeded to the Earldom of Caithness a few years ago, died in the Wairoa Hospital on Friday. Deceased had been laid up with pleurisy for some time, but his death was not expected so suddenly"
Rithia/Letitia Murray-Macgregor, nee Pongo/Paora, died on 28 May 1900 at Hawkes Bay, New Zealand, in childbirth with her third child Walter, born 5 months after Alick's death. The child Walter survived to adulthood.

References:

Hawke's Bay Herald 24 Huitanguru 1893
The Dominion Post, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
 
MACGREGOR, Alexander Evan Caithness Murray (Alick) (I2061)
 
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"The Mercury" Hobart 23 Aug 1951 under Deaths:-"FERRAR. - On August 20, 1951, at the residence of his daughter  (Mrs. A. Bayles, Cambridge Rd., Bellerive), Richard Binns, dear  husband of Emmie Ferrar, late   of Opossum Bay, in his 91st year.
FERRAR. - On August 20, 1951, at   the residence of his daughter   (Mrs. A. Bayles, Cambridge Rd.,   Bellerive), Richard Binns, youngest son of the late William Moore Ferrar, late of Plassey, Ross, in his 91st year."

Richard & Margaret Ferrar  had 5 dtrs & 1 son:-
1.   Elizabeth Dickson Ferrar b 1893 = A. Bayles, 2 sons & 2 dtrs
2.   Thomas Moore Ferrar  b 1895 = 1. A. Corney, 2 sons & 1 dtr = 2. ? Mitchell
3.   Florence Victoria Ferrar b 1896   = R. Atkinson, 1 son & 1 dtr
4.   Mary Kathleen Ferrar b 1898 = Edward Oliver, 2 sons & 2 dtrs5.
5.  Ruth Ferrar   = ? Atkinson
6.  Annie Margaret Ferrar 
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